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News TitleCAC Warns Against 'Avalanche Beacon' Apps
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The Canadian Avalanche Centre is warning people against using smartphone applications that are being billed as avalanche transceivers.

In a news release, the CAC said that three European-made applications being marketed as economical alternatives to transceivers are not recommended for use.

The applications are the iSis Intelligent (Mountain) Rescue System, the Snøg Avalanche Buddy, and SnoWhere.

The CAC says the applications have some serious issues.

“Not only are these new apps incapable of connecting with other avalanche transceivers, they are also incompatible between themselves, so one type of app can’t find another,” said CAC Executive Director Gilles Valade in a statement.

Smartphones don't transmit well through snow, the CAC says. They don't come close to matching the 457 kHz standard adopted by the transceiver industry. they use WiFi or Bluetooth signals, which are significantly weakened when passing through snow, and easily deflected by the solid objects we expect to see in avalanche debris," Valade said. "And the accuracy of a GPS signal is nowhere near the precision required for finding an avalanche victim. ”

The CAC also expressed concern about the battery life, robustness, reliability and interference.

Cellphones also have the ability to interfere with avalanche transceivers. Two recent studies by researchers show that transceivers should be at least 20 cm away from electronic devices when in send mode, and at least 50 cm away when in search mode. Interference between transceiver signals and Bluetooth and WiFi signals has been documented.

Read the full report on the applications below:

Smartphone Avalanche Search Apps—A Review by AlexCooperRTR

Photos
Canadian Avalanche Centre
_Canadian Avalanche Centre
https://bcmc.ca/m/photos/get_image/file/f859eb06eedfe5b9d9fdf955e1ca27ab.jpg
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